Therapy in Nottingham & Counselling Services Nottingham now take card payments

Therapy in Nottingham and Counselling services Nottingham now take card payments.

To make accessing therapy in Nottingham as simple and flexible as possible for our current and perspectives clients, Counselling Services Nottingham is pleased to accept debit and credit card payments at no additional charge and clients can do this at the end of their sessions at any location. We accept payments from clients as they go along and don’t ask for upfront payments. We feel that clients should only ever pay as and when they are completely satisfied with the services we provide.

We hope that by adding this payment method to the other ways people can pay being:, cash, cheque and bank transfer,  accessing therapy is now even more convenient for clients.

If you have any questions about accessing therapy and counselling in Nottingham, including payments please do make contact

Counselling services nottingham

“We believe that counselling and therapy should be as hassle free and as convenient as possible to engage in and for that reason have extended the ways in which private and or corporate clients can pay” Andrew Harvey, Director, Counselling Services Nottingham,.

For corporate clients, we offer account facilities with invoicing and credit facilities when needed. Please call for details.

For additional details on how to access therapy in Nottingham click our about page. We offer therapy in Nottingham at 2 different locations. See the links near the top of this page for more information.

Our other company Addictions Counselling and Addictions Therapy  Nottingham also accepts these forms of payment.

Counselling and Therapy in Nottingham.

Counselling and Therapy In Nottingham

Here are the most searched terms related to counselling and therapy in Nottingham (for December 2014) that we deal with here at Counselling Services Nottingham. Whilst this is not an exhaustive list of what we work with, it will give the reader an idea of the diversity of what people come to counselling and therapy for. A number of the following terms are widely used as diagnostic terms, and I, the author of this piece, am mindful that not everyone embraces the diagnostic meaning of mental distress and/or experience, and am therefore inviting the reader to embrace or reject the terms in whatever way works best for them.

What are people searching for on the internet for therapy & counselling that Counselling Services Nottingham can help with? Here’s a list with the most searched terms at the top. (Source; The Counselling Directory – Online Directory of UK based counsellors and therapist)

  1. Anxiety
  2. Addiction including alcohol addiction, sex addiction, porn addiction, gambling addiction and drug addiction
  3. Relationship issues
  4. Depression
  5. Generalised anxiety disorder
  6. Bipolar disorder / manic depression
  7. Seasonal affective disorder (sad)
  8. Self Esteem, Low Self Esteem
  9. Panic disorder
  10. Family issues
  11. Affairs and betrayals
  12. Separation and divorce
  13. Abuse
  14. Cross-cultural relationships
  15. Anger, Anger management
  16. Bereavement Counselling, Bereavement therapy
  17. Personality disorders
  18. Emotional abuse
  19. Sexual abuse
  20. Attachment disorder
  21. Low self-confidence
  22. Stress, Stress management
  23. Suicidal thoughts
  24. Work-related stress
  25. Trauma
  26. Passive aggressive behaviour
  27. Sexual Issues
  28. Career and Work related issues
  29. Dissociation
  30. Psychosis
  31. Mental health

If you or someone you know is struggling with distress, mental health struggles of other challenges, counselling may help, for details and to book a free initial consultation please make contact.

 

Am I addicted ?

Am I addicted? When is a problem an addiction? By Andrew Harvey, Counsellor and Therapist. 

Have you ever asked yourself that question “am I addicted” ? or maybe someone else has said they think you may be if so, this article is for you, its also for you if you have ever asked, “is she/he addicted ?”

Before I start my little article here, I want to say that I respect that more than one understanding of addiction and recovery exists; I hold a pluralistic perspective when it comes to the subject. I do, with my best intentions, do what I can to respect these diverse understandings. I do not claim to hold an ultimate truth; I write here from my own personal and professional experience: an experience that has included working with, treating and sharing with incredible individuals who have turned their lives around, sometimes before addiction really got a hold sometimes not. My experience also, sadly, includes working with, treating and sharing with people who never moved to a solid recovery. Some are sadly no longer with us as a result of addiction.

What gave me the motivation to write this article is a question that I often get asked. Not maybe using these exact words, it can be something like ‘I think I may be addicted to (Drugs /Drink/Internet/Porn/Shopping/Food/Gambling … chose one … or several), but I’m not sure. How would I know?’ Unfortunately, there is often no short answer and depending upon where you look for your answer you may arrive at different conclusions. If you Google ‘what is addiction?‘ you will end up with many diverse definitions and understandings, and depending upon how authentic and connected your level of awareness of your problem or addiction is (which if it is addiction, it’s both!) or level of denial, you might find one that fits with your perceived experience. The danger is, of course, if you are truly addicted and are experiencing the often accompanied deep level of denial you will settle for a website that denies addiction even exists. As you can imagine this might speak to the part of you that wants to keep going with the addiction. A claim that disputes widely held understandings of addiction may well concur with your own denial and keep you going along the long road (sometimes short) of loss, because that’s what addiction, in my experience, leads to: loss of connection, hope, money, dignity, self, love and for some, life.
So how do you know if your problem is “just a problem” or an addiction? I guess a simple and extremely reductionist answer is: try stopping (and here’s the crucial bit) and STAY STOPPED. Most addicts can stop for a length of time, but the truth of addiction is they can’t stay stopped. Here we are presented with another issue, that of choice. Many a real addict will say ‘yes I stopped and I started again, because I chose to’ … REALLY! Did YOU choose or did your addicted self choose? I refer to my previous mention of denial. Here we see it in the form of “I can control this; it doesn’t control me I choose to live this life”, another path to the road of loss. Denial has been mentioned in this piece on more than one occasion. It is frequently a symptom of addiction; it’s a denial that the problem has crossed a line and if in some sort of recovery, relapse occurs, it is often denial related: a denial of how bad it was before: a denial of loss of personal control; a denial of the loss of personal choice; a denial of what needs to be done to stay in recovery; and often a denial of the person’s true values and personality.

So, in short , what’s the answer? “Am I addicted or do I just have a problem?”  My unsophisticated, yet caring, answer is … you probably won’t know. You will need help to investigate and find out, in the form of another human being because,  left alone with an online test or website, if you are addicted your denial might well run riot. So if you really want to know,  seek help from people with good recovery (Alcoholics Anonymous or other 12 Step fellowship) or a professional, your GP might be a good place to start. Addiction really takes hold in isolation, so that act of reaching out to another is, in itself, is a step towards recovery.
At the end of the day, if you’re asking yourself the question, maybe you and the people that love you deserve an informed answer. I truly hope you find your answer and act on it. Recovery happens, and when it dose it is truly a re-connection with self and others.

Andrew Harvey
Andrew is a therapist and counsellor working both private practice and for one of the UK’s leading providers of action recovery services.

Counselling Services Nottingham’s sister company Nottingham based AddictionsCounselling.net provides therapy, face to face and SKYPE therapy for all types of addiction including; alcoholism, alcohol addiction, drug abuse, drug addiction, gambling, sex addiction, internet addiction,  Porn addiction and other compulsive behaviours/addictions. 

 Federation of Drug and Alcohol Professionals

Making changes that last

Making changes that last….. I’m posting this again, as its January ! and as we know that’s the time of the year that most people seek to make do things differently.

Written by Andrew Harvey, Counsellor and therapist. 

As they say … ‘change is good’ … not sure who ‘they’ are.. But let’s take it as a given…. Given that it is good, and people often have every intention of making changes and sticking with them, why is it so difficult? Why do people give up smoking to start again, lose weight to then gain even more, sign up to the gym and then stop going, agree with another to do things differently only to fall back into old ways of being? One of the main reasons is, people don’t understand and accept the nature of change. In this brief article, I hope to convey one or two thoughts on change, that I hope will be of use to anyone wanting to make lasting change and stick to it! These thoughts stem mostly from my work as a therapist working with hundreds of addicts and therefore witnessing people making and maintaining lifesaving changes.

New Year’s resolutions are often just that … They last for the duration of the New Year, even when the intention was for them to last forever. The reason is often making change is sometimes more challenging to maintain than making the initial change in the first place.

People often think of change as a one-off event, for example, they might make the decision to get more exercise and then fail to do so for the time period they intended (attend any gym in January, then return in April to see this for yourself). What happens is that the change process is not understood or given enough attention; change is an ongoing decision, not a one-off event. It’s a Process, not an Event … and that’s it really. Once you have done the initial stage of making the change, the next essential and ongoing step is the Maintenance Stage.

Making Changes that Last is often more about how people attend to maintaining the change they want, rather than the initial effort put into change. Below are a few tools and techniques that can be useful in maintaining change (the maintenance stage).

Change

Photo by Chris Lawton on Unsplash

• The change process often loses momentum or stops when you lose motivation. This is why it’s important to regularly recall and focus on why you wanted to make the change, get in touch at a deep level with the consequences of not making the change and consequences of making the change. Write if down! Look at it often, or cut out a picture that sums up the benefits for you .. or if you prefer, the consequence of not making the change. This is important. It repeatedly gets you to that place of motivation, where the initial energy can be found that started the change, it’s like making the change again and again, and that keeps it fresh! Many people I work with in addiction make a commitment to staying in recovery daily. That’s a great way to make it a priority and maintain momentum.

• Don’t do it alone. If you keep trying and not succeeding maybe it’s time to enlist some help. For example, if you are trying to stop drinking and are failing to stay stopped then maybe an organisation like Alcoholics Anonymous might be the way forward, often people seek help from a counsellor to make and maintain changes. Personal trainers or a friend to go walking with might be the key to keeping you in the maintenance stages of change.

• If you slip backwards with change, learn from it, work out what went wrong, and what lessons are there to be learnt. Questions that might help include: what were the signs that my change was losing its momentum? What do I need to do differently next time? What help might I need to get back on track? And very importantly ask yourself “do I really want this change?” It might be worth writing these answers down and sharing your findings with someone who might be able to offer different perspectives.

Good luck with making and most importantly maintaining change. Making Changes That Last can be Fun !

 

Listen … 

BBC Radio Nottingham Logo

Andrew Harvey talks about maintaining new year’s resolutions on BBC Radio

Watch …

3 Tips in 2 Minutes on video by Andrew Harvey 

 

SKYPE counselling uk

SKYPE Counselling UK and therapy.

Update : (28/2/18)  – Counselling Services Nottingham now work online with additional online platforms alongside SKYPE, this offer increased reliability and we have found them to be preferred by many of our clients, we are still happy to use SKYPE when clients prefer.

SKYPE Counselling UK.

At Counselling Services Nottingham we are finding SKYPE Counselling is an option that more and more clients are making use of, either as the only source of our work together or in combination with face 2 face sessions. It offers convenience and a more economical option than face 2 face work.

See our SKYPE Page for details and an interview with therapist Andrew Harvey on the BBC.

SKYPE Counselling  UK available Monday to Friday from 8am to 10pm , subject to availability. Urgent appointments can sometimes be arranged. Please call for more details 07802 767 462

SKYPE therapy

SKYPE counselling

 

A guide to therapy using Skype™

SKYPE therapy and Counselling

SKYPE therapy is another way I work with clients via SKYPE offering 50-minute sessions. SKYPE counselling has both opportunities and challenges as outlined below and in my interview with the BBC available to listen to below.

Here is an interview that I did with a colleague on the BBC talking about SKPE therapy and counselling.

A guide to therapy using Skype™

Skype therapy is becoming increasingly popular, it even has its own name now “Skypotherapy”!

SKYPE Therapy

By Andrew Harvey,  MBACP, Cert Men Hlth Stud (Open).

skype therapy

March 2014

What is it?

Psychotherapy, counselling and therapy are terms that are often used interchangeably. For this guide I will use the terms in the same way. The BACP (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy) definition of counselling is:

“Counselling and psychotherapy are umbrella terms that cover a range of talking therapies. They are delivered by trained practitioners who work with people over a short or long term to help them bring about effective change or enhance their wellbeing”. BACP www.bacp.co.uk

If you don’t already have Skype™ then here is a link to all you need to know to get started using it www.skype.com/en/what-is-skype/

Traditionally clients have met with a counsellor face to face together in a counselling room. Skype™ counselling moves from counsellor and client being together in a room to being connected via Skype™, counsellor located in their place of work and client wherever works for them, usually at home.

Why people might chose Skype™ counselling over face to face counselling.

  • It’s often cheaper; many counsellors offer rates £10 or £5 below their face to face rate.
  • It saves clients time, no travel to and from the counselling location.
  • If  you are away from home from time to time, you don’t have to miss your session, just plug in, log on and connect.
  • Some people feel more comfortable working with a therapist who is not local to them, no chance of bumping into them at the post office!
  • Sometimes therapists who work with Skype™ can offer greater flexibility in terms of session times, ideal for people with busy lives and shift workers.
  • Many counsellors who use Skype™ offer a free brief consultation; this gives clients the chance to connect with 2 or 3 therapists easily to see who they can work with best.
  • For some leaving home might be difficult, emotional or physical challenges might make it difficult to leave home. If leaving home is difficult part of the Skype™ therapy work might be working towards being able to meet face to face.
  • Some clients may find it is easier to be open and more comfortable talking over Skype™ as opposed to face to face. Some research has shown that counselling via Skype™ can help people feel less inhibited and more forthright during their sessions.
  • Greater choice, when you remove the limitation of travel many more possibilities become available to clients.

Challenges / Potential issues AND CAUTION!

  • Isolation can become an issue for some when dealing with emotional difficulties. Here Skype™ therapy can offer a real opportunity for someone that is finding it difficult to go out. However it is important to maybe discuss with your therapist about your use of Skype™ therapy over face to face counselling.
  • Confidentiality: ensure you are in a confidential setting for your sessions; you want to feel free to talk and be open.
  • Technology can, and occasionally will, fail us. Most counsellors will agree with you what to do if you can’t make contact via Skype™ or if the connection fails.
  • Skype™  is not appropriate for clients who are experiencing profound mental health issues and/or clients who are suicidal. If you or someone you know is in crisis a GP or local hospital will be able to help. Help can be found on my links page here Links .
  • If  at any time you feel uncomfortable working with your counsellor or Skype™ therapy I would encourage you to talk to them; remember you are in charge. You may find that Skype™ therapy is not for you, if that’s the case, and you are able I would encourage you to try face to face work as you may find this more appropriate for you and any challenges you may still be struggling with.

How can I “do” Skype™ counselling?

  • You will need a Skype™ connection, you can download the Skype™ application for free, and this will guide you how to set up and even shows you how to make a test call. You will need a good connection, sound and picture for  Skype™ to work at its best.
  • First, find a therapist who provides Skype™ therapy who you might like to make contact with; initial contact might be via the phone and/or email. They will guide you from there. A good place to find an insured and qualified therapist is via this website www.itsgoodtotalk.org.uk. The author would recommend only working with a member of a reputable counselling organisation, for example, the BACP has members register you can check here www.bacpregister.org.uk.
  • Most sessions last 50 minutes or an hour, people often work with therapists once a week. You should have a contract, this might include issues relating to confidentiality, payment, how long, how often and when you will make contact with each other.

Author: Andrew Harvey www.CounsellingServiceNottingham.co.uk

info@counsellingservicesnottingham.co.uk

Skype skypetalkandrew

Declaration of interest: The author of this article is a BACP registered therapist and listed on the It’s Good To Talk Website, he provides SKYPE (and other online applications) and face to face counselling.